Learning today for the workforce of tomorrow

By Shereen Shabnam

The world of education has changed as more and more industries get impacted by the pandemic. As my daughter studies for her degree in Forensic Science and Criminology remotely this month, as parents we fully understand her worries, apprehensions, doubts, and stress given that her dad is equally responsible for educating graduates remotely and working twice as hard to make an impact.

Many believe that success equates to a student who studies hard, passes with flying colors and finishes graduation. But the real challenge begins when entering the professional world and depending on the professional capabilities of managers and responding to the requirements of the role or job.

We all agree that a productive and healthy work environment depends on soft skills with character traits that reflect a good work ethic, compassion, understanding diversity and a lot of emotional intelligence. Universities often rate students better if they are able to value and appreciate skills that employers actively seek in talents but with most studying remotely, these character traits are easily missed.

 Students being stuck at home and learning independently may miss out on interpersonal interactions and may have to work harder to naturally grow themselves not just in qualifications but also in their soft skills to do meaningful work in teams.

Students learning at home today will need to get innovative and learn entrepreneurship skills, nurture team spirit online with peers and continue interacting with friends and peers, building relationships with other students remotely.

Another way to be successful is to get a good mentor who could be a senior student in the same field or an experienced professional who can guide students to subjects that suits them best. These days, additional skills helps secure a job as well. Learning a new language for instance may open new doors.

As youngsters handle the pressures and difficulties of online classes, not being in touch with friends physically and socially, they need all the support they can get in maintaining sanity, being inclusive to peers and building relationships.

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